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5 habits to be a successful truck driver

Five Habits that every Truck Driver must Adopt to be a successful trucker

The world of trucking is not as obvious as it seems. There are times when a trucker might feel frustrated because that’s what the job demands. It demands that a trucker should be able to take in frustration and find a way out of tough situations. A lot of responsibility is on the shoulders of a trucker and it’s not just about being attentive while on the road. A driver should always be prepared to deal with any circumstance that might occur during the drive. Here are a few habits that every trucker should adopt to achieve success:

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The Coolest Woman in Logistics

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, women represent almost 47% of all the workforce in the United States. This ratio, unfortunately, doesn’t translate to many individual industries. In trucking, for example, women remain significantly underrepresented. Reports from the American Trucking Association published a couple of years ago found that women composed merely 11.4% of the trucking workforce.

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Logistics Word of the Day: Backhaul

The logistics industry almost has its own language. A typical conversation between two logistics pros is filled with jargon that is very hard for industry outsiders to understand. This article series will explore some of these words as a fun way of getting to know the ins and outs of logistics.

Today’s word is backhaul.

Imagine this scenario. You’re hauling a shipment from Miami to Atlanta. You deliver you load on time, the cargo is unloaded quickly, you’re all set to go back home. Good news, right? Not so fast. If you’re heading back home with an empty container, that return trip home won’t be so happy. If you’re lucky to find a backhaul, however, then it’s definitely good news.

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The Mile that Really Counts

A supply chain is rarely a direct shipment from point A to point B. Modern delivery logistics often involve multiple legs and stops in hubs and warehouses, all important in making a supply chain run smoothly and efficiently. But the era of e-commerce has made one particular part of the supply chain more critical than others: the last mile delivery.

In logistics, last mile delivery refers to the movement of goods from a transportation hub to its final destination, usually a home or office. It’s not a new concept by any means. But the prevalence of online shopping has changed consumer behavior in such a way that its importance in the supply chain has reached new heights.

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Logistics Word of the Day: Pup

We all love puppies. Very few animals are more adorable. In trucking, there’s a different kind of pup. They’re also small in size (relatively) and some even might find them adorable too. Pups refer to containers that are just 26–29 feet long, instead of the standard 53 feet. Even though they’re half the size of a standard container, they can be hauled by any tractor trailer.

In logistics, pups are a great asset in terms of efficiency and flexibility. They are used frequently to deliver in urban areas with congested traffic and narrow roads, or anywhere where hauling a full-size container is difficult. They also give more efficiency to shippers with smaller shipments that don’t require a full container. They are also helpful for oversize loads, as they can be attached to another container for more cargo space.

Learn more about making logistics and trucking more efficient

Content Creator: @pablitotorres

The ABC of the ELD Mandate

It’s been almost a month since the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) started enforcing the ELD mandate, but the issue is still quite a hot topic in the trucking industry. ELD stands for an “electronic logging device” that, starting December 18, 2017, operators of commercial motor vehicles covered by the law, must install in their trucks to automatically log certain data, mainly about the driver’s hours of service (commonly referred to as HOS). Even though it seems a fairly straightforward regulation, it has stirred plenty of controversy.

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What Is Blockchain and Why Should You Care

As far as buzzwords go in 2017, “bitcoin” is probably near the top of the list. But this post is not about encrypted, decentralized payment systems. It’s about the framework beneath cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin known as blockchain.

Explaining the technical aspects of blockchain can get complicated pretty quickly. But, in a nutshell, think of blockchain as a digital ledger that is shared across a network to facilitate the tracking of transactions or exchanged goods. In the currency world, a blockchain substitutes a traditional central banking system in an attempt to make transactions more secure and efficient. But blockchain is not limited to currency and payments. Virtually anything can be recorded and tracked in a blockchain network. Anything, such as goods in a supply chain. So, as you can imagine, blockchain networks open up many exciting possibilities in the logistics industry.

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Bond, Carrier Bond

All goods valued over $2,500 imported to the United States for commercial purposes, or other commodities subject to federal regulations, require the posting of a Customs bond to make sure that all duties, taxes, and fees owed to the federal government will be paid according to the law.

Bonded merchandise can be moved or stored after it has entered the United States before the duties are paid. Only after all applicable fees are paid is the merchandise cleared for commercial distribution or activity. For example, if you import a container full of washing machines from Japan through the Port of Miami, you can transport them to a warehouse facility and keep them there for a certain amount of time before paying any duties as long as you don’t sell or distribute the machines beforehand.

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Logistics Word of the Day: Pre-Pull

The logistics industry almost has its own language. A typical conversation between two logistics pros is filled with jargon that is very hard for industry outsiders to understand. This article series will explore some of these words as a fun way of getting to know the ins and outs of logistics.

Today’s word is pre-pull.

When a container arrives at a port, you usually have a specified number of days to pick it up before you begin incurring what is known as demurrage fees. Think of demurrage as a kind of late payment. These fees can be quite costly, as they are often charged by container and by day. So if your shipment includes several containers, it could mean a serious hit to your bottom line even if you were late for just a couple of days.

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Logistics Word of the Day: Dead-head

The logistics industry almost has its own language. A typical conversation between two logistics pros is filled with jargon that is very hard for industry outsiders to understand. This article series will explore some of these words as a fun way of getting to know the ins and outs of logistics.

Today’s word is dead-head.

In music, a deadhead can only mean one thing: a loyal fan of the legendary band The Grateful Dead. Deadheads are mostly a happy, fun-loving bunch.

In shipping, however, a dead-head is something else entirely, and it’s not fun at all. A dead-head refers to any part of the transportation trip in which no freight is being carried. It’s a very common occurrence in trucking. Many trucks complete a shipment, only to head back home with an empty container, burning time and gas money but generating no revenue. That’s why the distances traveled by dead-heads are known as empty miles.

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